Arthritis of the Foot and Ankle | Gateway Surgery Solutions

Arthritis of the Foot and Ankle

Arthritis is inflammation of one or more of your joints. It can cause pain and stiffness in any joint in the body, and is common in the small joints of the foot and ankle.

Although there is no cure for arthritis, there are many treatment options available to slow the progress of the disease and relieve symptoms. With proper treatment, many people with arthritis are able to manage their pain, remain active, and lead fulfilling lives.

Nonsurgical Treatment

Initial treatment of arthritis of the foot and ankle is usually nonsurgical. Your doctor may recommend a range of treatment options.

Lifestyle modifications. Minimizing activities that aggravate the condition.

  • Switching from high-impact activities (like jogging or tennis) to lower impact activities (like swimming or cycling) to lessen the stress on your foot and ankle.
  • Losing weight to reduce stress on the joints, resulting in less pain and increased function.

Physical therapy.

Specific exercises can help increase range of motion and flexibility, as well as help strengthen the muscles in your foot and ankle. Your doctor or a physical therapist can help develop an individualized exercise program that meets your needs and lifestyle.

Assistive devices.

Using a cane or wearing a brace—such as an ankle-foot orthosis (AFO)-may help improve mobility. Shoe orthotics or custom-made shoes with stiff soles and rocker bottoms can help minimize pressure on the foot and decrease pain. In addition, if deformity is present, a shoe insert may tilt the foot of ankle back straight, decreasing pain in the joint.

Medications.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen and naproxen, can help reduce swelling and relieve pain. In addition, cortisone is a very effective anti-inflammatory agent that can be injected into an arthritic joint. Although an injection of cortisone can provide pain relief and reduce inflammation, the effects are temporary.

Surgical Treatment

Surgery may be necessary if your pain causes disability and is not relieved with nonsurgical treatment. The type of surgery will depend on the type and location of the arthritis and the impact of the disease on your joints. 

Arthroscopic debridement.

This surgery may be helpful in the early stages of arthritis.

Arthroscopic surgery is most effective when pain is due to contact between bone spurs and the arthritis has not yet caused significant narrowing of the joint space between the bones.

Arthrodesis (fusion).

Arthrodesis fuses the bones of the joint completely. The goal of the procedure is to reduce pain by eliminating motion in the arthritic joint.

During arthrodesis, damaged cartilage is removed and then pins, plates and screws are used to fix the joint in a permanent position. Over time, the bones fuse or grow together, just like two ends of a broken bone grow together as it heals.

Screws are used to fuse the bones of the hind-foot and prevent painful motion.

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